My first mentor…

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Today is my Dad’s birthday. He would be 83 today, had we not lost him to emphysema at the age of 71. Dad was a handsome guy as you can see from this dashing photo. He has a little bit of that “Mad Men” mystique about him in this photo, but not in real life.

My dad, Richard “Dick” Loewenguth, was always one of my best advocates and my first mentor. As his only daughter, with 5 sons, Dad and I shared a special bond. My brothers would claim I was spoiled, but you can only be spoiled if you are the only girl and the youngest; I was second in line.

My dad never went to college, and yet became a very successful, self-directed businessman. Dad was a manufacturers representative. He was a charismatic man who loved and lived for his family. He taught us about hard work, and about problem solving, and about being fearless in the face of intimidation or the unknown. Talk about fearless — Dad came home to his wife weeks before the Christmas holiday and tells the mother of 5 little ones that he is going to start his own company. I believe he took the plunge with one client signed. That took courage for both of them.

Though I do remember sensing that my mother was not very pleased about the prospect of having to manage the 5 of us, while supporting Dad as his phone receptionist. It would go something like this:

Phone rings: “Kids, QUIET!!! This is your Dad’s phone. David and Mark, stop picking on Tom. Peter and Mary, take them out of the room. EVERYBODY QUIET — She’d pause, smile, then answer ‘Hello, R. G. Loewenguth Company, may I help you?’”  Once the call was complete, the noise and chaos would erupt again, and so it would go throughout the day. My mom, Joan used to say, my father was not crazy. If he were between calls and able to come home for lunch, he would simply keep driving. Why come home to the chaos for lunch? Dad’s success was not without having an incredible wife and assistant by his side. Dad could call Mom at 4:00 pm, and ask her to hire a sitter, that they were taking a client and his wife out to dinner in 2 hours. And somehow, she always looked incredible! Mom jumped for these dinners, and we would get the sitter and pizza. A good night for all.

Dad traveled a lot, primarily around New York State, and so was typically gone 1 to 2 nights a week. When I was 10 or 11, and If I had the day off school, I would join him on his calls around town. He would tell me I had to wear a dress, and when we arrived at the call, I would go in with him and wait in reception while he made his call. Everyone knew and loved Dad, and the receptionists were always very welcoming of me. But I remember that I just loved watching and listening to my Dad as he did what he did best — sell a product and service. He had a genuine warmth about him that people never felt as though they were being sold anything, but instead, they were being enlightened by their good friend, Dick Loewenguth. The day always included lunch out, and ended up somewhere for ice cream or pie. Dad knew all the good places for pie in town.

Despite his busy career, Dad was always there for us  — making games, helping us with our homework, and when in trouble, always there to listen and help us sort out our challenges. I was a Senior at Nazareth Academy, and President of my class. As part of graduation, I was asked to open  the graduation with a prayer. So I developed a prayer — short and sweet. Well the morning of graduation, we had to go to the Eastman Theater, and I had to practice my prayer. The principal at that time was a very intimidating woman, Sister Saint Peter. In a not so “saintly” manner, Sister St. Peter, just 8 hours before graduation, told me that my prayer was all wrong. I was supposed to be giving remarks as president of the class. As you may imagine, I was rattled by this. My plan was rehearsal, then loads of us were jumping in cars and heading to Ontario Beach Park for a graduation picnic. But no, not me, I was now in a panic mode. In less than 8 hours, I had to come up with something to say that was, in the words of Sister St. Peter, “Inspirational — inspire them Mary, you are the class president”.

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Me, Dad, and my brother Pete

I called my Dad at his office, and he told me to head home, he would meet me there. Dad cancelled 3 appointments he had later that day to sit in the living room with me for the next 4 hours. He helped me find the words for my “graduation inspiration.” Later that night, he delivered me in my white gown to the Eastman, kissed me good-bye, told me he was proud, and assured me I would be great. When I saw him heading back toward the stage, I asked where he was going, and he said, “To find your principal”. I stood quietly by as I saw my Dad spot the principal, and though I could not hear him, I could see that neither of them looked very happy. As he walked away, he smiled at me and simply said, “I told her that next time she should be a little more clear on message.” Dad looked pretty content; Sister Saint Peter did not. I suspect Dad once again advocated for me.

Dad and I also had our challenges. I recall one conversation where he made the mistake of saying to me out loud, that women going to work was negatively impacting families. As a young working mother at this time, proud of both my family and my career, I really took Dad on in this conversation. “Dad, do you understand that I went to school for an education because I want a career? And do you understand that I am good at it? And do you understand in today’s economy, many families are being supported by two parents? And…” My Dad finally raised his hand up in the sign of a cease fire, and said, “OK, I give up! You have proven you can work and raise a family.”

I remember the day I told him that I would be starting at the Monroe County Bar Association as Executive Director. He was very proud of me, and asked that I bring home some newsletters and a set of the by-laws as he wanted to better understand what I would be doing here. I recall sitting with him over a laptop one night giving him the tour of the website. He marveled at the complexity of the Association, and watched the newspaper daily in the event that the MCBA was written up. “Mary, if I see that you (the MCBA) are in the paper, I will call you right away.” Thanks Dad!

One day during my first year I opened a letter from my Dad. His emphysema was getting worse, and despite being told he needed to quit smoking, he quit too late, and it was almost 5 years after he quit that he was diagnosed. In his letter to me he had enclosed a letter that he wanted to send to the tobacco companies blaming them for his emphysema. Now that I worked for the lawyers, the letter was asking that I help him bring a class action lawsuit against the tobacco companies. I went and visited Dad that night on the way home. As I entered their apartment, he was sitting in his chair with his oxygen tank on. I sat down next to him with his letter in hand, and his eyes brightened as he anticipated my response. “Dad, we can’t sue the tobacco companies. You knew you should have quit years ago, and sadly, you quit, and then the emphysema developed.” “You have to own this one Dad.” I went on to say that just because I was the MCBA ExD, I could not bring a lawsuit against the tobacco companies. It was a difficult conversation to have, but he understood what I was saying.

Dick Loewenguth was a great man, and on this day, I think of him, and am grateful for so many of the gifts he gave me over the years. He was my first mentor, and to be on the record, probably my best.

Happy Birthday Dad!

 

Guest Post By Liz Novak: Opportunities for Dialogue…

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According to the Oxford Dictionary, two definitions of the word “Dialogue” are:

Noun: “A discussion between two or more people or groups, esp. one directed toward exploration of a particular subject or resolution of a problem.”

Verb: “To take part in a conversation or discussion to resolve a problem.”

Spring for the MCBA is a busy season – from CLEs to events to membership renewals and more – and 2014 is no exception. In the midst of our regular “busy-ness”, we also have added two opportunities for dialogue about bigger issues that are happening at a national level.

Voting Rights
As part of the YWCA’s Stand Against Racism and this year’s ABA Law Day theme (American Democracy and the Rule of Law: Why Every Vote Matters), the MCBA, with the Rochester Black Bar Association and the Greater Rochester Association for Women Attorneys, is hosting a forum on Thursday, April 24 at 12:15 p.m. called: “Voters’ Rights – Past and Present”.

Moderated by MCBA President Diane Cecero, the forum will include speakers Mark Sample, MCC History Professor, and Scott Forsyth, Forsyth & Forsyth Law Firm. It also will include a Q&A panel: Hon. Karen Morris, Fatimat Reid, RBBA President, and Melanie Wolk, GRAWA President.

We’re offering it at no charge thanks to sponsor Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC. Click here to register for it.

Income Inequality
Another opportunity for dialogue will be on Friday, May 16 at noon with the Speakers Forum: “Income Inequality: Fact or Fiction. If Fact, What, If Anything, Can We Do About It?”

Moderated by Michael Wolford, the forum will feature: David Cay Johnston, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and Author of “Divided: The Perils of Our Growing Inequality”; Professor Clifford Smith, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Finance and Economics, Simon School of Business/University of Rochester; William R. Nojay J.D., New York State Assemblyman, Assembly District 133, Elaine G. Spaull, Ph.D., J.D., Rochester City Councilmember and Executive Director, The Center for Youth. To register for it, please click here.

Both of these events are a part of a larger discussion. I suspect as legal professionals you see first hand how these issues can affect clients in a variety of ways. We invite all of you to come be part of the dialogue for going forward.

Thanks for checking in…

Liz

And the Nominees are…

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I was walking into the Telesca Center for Justice the other morning, and along came the wonderful Loren Kroll (looking dapper as usual). Loren and I chatted briefly about how it was nice to feel spring in the air, and then he said, “Oh Mary, I sent my ballot in, but I have to tell you, I only knew one person!” He then went on to infer either that he is aging or disconnected — I don’t want to put words in Loren’s mouth, but that was the gist of the message.

I started thinking about how we could make this better. Not sure if you noticed, but this year with the ballot, we enclosed a short bio paragraph on each of the candidates hoping to provide useful information on each of the candidates. But taking it one step further, I decided that for this week’s blog we would re-send their bios’ and include their picture so you can place a face to a name.

I understand that with the new non-profit law, by next year, we will be able to do our nomination ballots electronically, therefore, we will be able to include their portraits, along with their bio. This will be so much better and obviously, more efficient.

Perhaps you already sent your ballot in, if not, please let this serve as a gentle reminder to send your ballot today, while also giving you a glimpse at the new MCBA leadership.

It is hard to believe that we are in the final quarter of the 2013-14 bar year, and as one of the many activities this time of year, we are getting ready to welcome a new set of officers and trustees for the Monroe County Bar Association Board. President Diane Cecero has had a very busy year; always busier than anticipated. Like the many presidents that came before her, Diane is beginning to count the days till the end of her term. When you take on another job, on top of your full-time job, the demands are immense. I appreciate all that she has done as President of the MCBA.

I am so fortunate to work with great bar leaders every year, and next year will be no exception as Steve Modica prepares to assume the role of President on July 1, 2014. Following Steve’s term, Neil Rowe, will assume the role of President-Elect.

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So please take a moment and meet your new MCBA leadership.

Here are the 2014-15 MCBA Officer and Trustee Nominees:

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Neil J. Rowe, Esq.  (President-Elect)

Neil Rowe, a graduate of Washington & Lee University School of Law, is a Solo Practitioner and Lecturer in Organizational Management at Keuka College.  Previously, Neil was an attorney for the NYS Mental Hygiene Service, Fourth Judicial Department, for 32 years, 25 of which were as Deputy Director.  He has been a member of the MCBA since 1999 and currently serves as Secretary of the MCBA Board of Trustees.  He is a member of the Executive Committee, past chair of the Public Education Committee and past member of the Center for Education Board of Directors, Memorial and Strategic Plan, Awards, Communications, Disability, Labor & Employment Law, Elder Law, Membership & Events, and Bankruptcy Committees.

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Amy Varel, Esq.  (Treasurer)

Amy Varel, a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, is a Partner with McConville Considine Cooman & Morin, PC., practicing in the areas of business, health care and employment.  She has been a member of the MCBA since 2000 and currently is serving her first term as MCBA Treasurer.  Amy is Chair of the House Finance Committee and a member of the Executive Committee, Business Law Section and Council, Membership & Events and Solo & Small Practice Committees.  She is past Chair of the Young Lawyers Section, Business Law Council and Membership & Events Committee and past member of the Academy of Law.  Amy is also a member of the Greater Rochester Association for Women Attorneys (GRAWA) and Business Law Section of the New York State Bar Association (NYSBA).

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Mark D. Funk, Esq.  (Secretary)

Mark Funk, a graduate of the University of Dayton School of Law, is a Solo Practitioner practicing in the areas of criminal and family law.  He has been a member of the MCBA since 1996 and is currently serving on the MCBA Board of Trustees, a member of the Criminal Justice and Family Law Sections, Family Law Council and Solo and Small Practice Committee.  Mark is a past member of the Business Law and Young Lawyers Section, Environmental Law, Lawyers for Learning and Mentoring Committees.

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Michael E. Davis, Esq.  (Trustee – Three Year Term)

Michael Davis, a graduate of the SUNY Buffalo Law School, is an attorney with the Rochester City School District.  His main areas of practice are civil litigation and education law.  He has been a member of the MCBA since 1982 and is a past member of the Lawyers for Learning Committee and Municipal Lawyers Committees.

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Wende J. Knapp, Esq.  (Trustee – Three Year Term)

Wende Knapp, a graduate of the SUNY Buffalo Law School, is an Associate in the Labor and Employment practice group at Harter Secrest & Emery LLP.  She has been a member of the MCBA since 2009 and is currently Chair of the Young Lawyers Section and member of the Disability, Labor & Employment Committee.  She is a past member of the Diversity and Nominating Committees and Litigation Section.  Wende also is a member of the Greater Rochester Association for Women Attorneys (GRAWA), and is Co-Chair of the SUNY Buffalo Law School Alumni Rochester Steering Committee.

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Elizabeth J. McDonald, Esq.  (Trustee – Three Year Term)

Elizabeth McDonald, a graduate of Albany Law School, is Principal Law Clerk to the Hon. Teresa D. Johnson, Supervising Judge, City Courts, 7th Judicial District.  She has been a member of the MCBA since 1979 and is currently Chair of the MCBA Awards Committee.  She is a past Dean of the Academy of Law and past member of the Fee Arbitration, Professional Performance and Unlawful Practice of Law Committees.  She is a member of the House of Delegates of the New York State Bar Association and is Chair-Elect of the NYSBA Senior Lawyers Section.  She serves on the Board of the New York Bar Foundation and Volunteer Legal Services Project.

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Amy E. Schwartz, Esq.  (Trustee – Three Year Term)

Amy Schwartz, a graduate of the SUNY Buffalo Law School, is a senior staff attorney with the Empire Justice Center, a legal service provider located at the Telesca Center for Justice.  She has been a member of the MCBA since 2000 and is a member of the Family Law Section.  She is a past member of the Ethics Committee.  Amy served as President of the Greater Rochester Association for Women Attorneys (GRAWA) in 2009-10 and is currently Chair of GRAWA’s Domestic Violence Committee and Co-Chair of the Women’s Bar Association of New York State (WBASNY) Domestic Violence Committee.

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Josie M. Sheppard, Esq.  (Trustee – Three Year Term)

Josie Sheppard, a graduate of the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, is an Associate with Harris Beach PLLC in the Business and Commercial Litigation Practice Group.  Since 2011, she has been a member of the MCBA and is a mentor at School 29 under MCBA’s Lawyers for Learning Program.  She is currently a member of MCBA’s Litigation and Young Lawyers Sections, and Diversity Committee.  Josie serves as Co-Chair of the Program Committee of the Greater Rochester Association for Women Attorneys (GRAWA), and is a member of the Rochester Black Bar Association (RBBA) and New York State Bar Association.

I hope you enjoyed reading and meeting all the new leaders. Please join me in congratulating them as they take on this new leadership role. They are your representatives, so know who they are, and next time you run into one of them on Main Street or at a bar event, introduce yourself. I know they will appreciate it.

Thanks for checking in,

Mary

 

Hope you didn’t miss it….

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The music was hot; the food was incredible; the beverages flowed; and fun was had by all! If you were not in attendance Friday night at the 4th Annual Jazz For Justice, you missed out on a great night. Jazz for Justice is the premier event hosted by the Foundation of the Monroe County Bar to build awareness of the work of the Foundation, build collegiality in the profession, and whose kidding who — to raise money, and that we did!! After expenses were paid, the Foundation raised almost $31,000 that will be paid out this year in grants to worthwhile projects within the Telesca Center and out in the community.

Special thanks go out to Bruce Lawrence (Boylan Code), Foundation President-Elect and JFJ Co-Chair in charge of Sponsorships, who shared the heavy lifting Chairship with one of our young attorney All-Stars, Jennifer Meldrum (Woods Oviatt Gilman), Co-Chair in charge of the Auctions and Food. Joining Jenn with the Auction and Food was Laura Myers (Wolford Law Firm), Christin Cornetta (Federal Court), Penny Dentinger (Xerox), Wende Knapp (Harter Secrest & Emery), Amanda Carden Agins (Harris Beach), Jimmy Paulino (Goldberg Segalla), Curtis Johnson (Davidson Fink), Helen Root (Nixon Peabody) and Melle Xu (Hiscock & Barclay). Jenn and her team put in incredible volunteer hours soliciting gifts, food and wine. What a team of young attorney volunteers! JFJ is one of the BIGGEST events of the bar season, and because it is so big, the Foundation hires some woman hours from Sanchez & Associates, Margaret Sanchez and her colleague, Lucy Allchin, to handle the 1,001 details of the event. They make our jobs easier!

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Special thanks also go out to the many sponsors that ensured the success of this event. First to our two improvisation sponsors:  The University of Rochester and the Hamilton Stern Construction. In addition, our Ragtime sponsors were:  Harris Beach PLLC, Heslin Rothenberg Farley & Mesitti PC, and Nixon Peabody LLP. Our Bepop sponsors were: Canandaigua National Bank & Trust; Faracci Lange, LLP; Harter Secrest & Emery LLP; Hiscock & Barclay LLP; Kammholz Messina, LLP; Modica & Associates, Attorneys, PLLC; Phillips Lytle, LLP; Post Resch Tallon Group Inc.; Rochester Area Community Foundation; Ward Greenberg Heller & Reidy LLP; The Wolford Law Firm LLP and Woods Oviatt Gilman LLP. Without all of our generous sponsors we could not deliver the kind of night we did at the price we do!

JFJ Sponsors

The student musicians who brought there incredible talent were: Adler Scheidt Quartet, Britton Quintet and the Detwieler Trio. The talent amongst this group of young musicians is incredible. Next time you are looking for a small trio for one of your own events, call me, and I will put you in touch with them.

JFJ Al Band

The featured caterers this year were:  Deliciously Different Catering, Tasteful Connections Catering, Label 7 Restaurant, and Sapori Cafe & Catering.

JFJ Label 7

A highlight of the evening is when MCBA member and Family Law Section Chair, Kelly Ciccone, took the stage, accompanied by one of the three Eastman trio’s to perform her rendition of “Summertime.” Check out Kelly and her incredible voice.

I had the pleasure of serving as Auctioneer of the Live Auction, and was pleased to hear that we raised more this year than in years past. Though from some I did hear, “you need to speak faster Mary”! Geez, no pressure there. I was focusing on who to target for the ask! I will do better next year.

JFJ Live Auction Pointing

The best part of Friday night’s event — it was pure fun with people that care about the profession, about the cause, about each other. We had lawyers, judges, clerks, friends, family, clients, sponsors and just fun people in attendance.

JFJ Crowd

Next year will be the 5th Anniversary of this wonderful collaboration with the Eastman School of Music. It was through the wisdom of an initial conversation with the late Dean Doug Lowry that the vision for JFJ was born. Dean Lowry, who embraced the event concept 4 years ago and gave us our sea legs to launch it, was honored Friday night in a tribute from Robert Witmer Jr, MCBA member and a past president of the University of Rochester Board of Trustees.

Take a moment and flip through some of the great memories of Friday night, and then watch for a future release date for the 2015 Jazz for Justice.

Thanks for checking in,

Mary

Judicial Evaluations…you have a role in spreading the word

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As my three children all approached the age of 18, I would talk with them about the importance of registering to vote, and that their vote matters. Most exciting for them was their first presidential election, but I emphasized the importance of state and local elections, because that is where we live.

When they would ask me about judges, I would talk to them about the importance of the role of the judiciary in our society. They would go on to ask questions about the judges, and which judges or candidates I knew. They would ask what I thought of the candidates, and I would respond with the results of our judicial evaluation ratings. That by placing our trust in the attorneys that know these candidates through direct interactions.

When I was interviewing for the position of Executive Director I asked the bar leadership, what is the most controversial activity that you engage in? The answer:  judicial evaluations.

Judicial evaluations, however, are more than just a controversial activity; they have a purpose. They serve to inform  the voter about judicial candidates based on evaluations from those who see their work in the legal community — fellow attorneys and judges.

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Though it is only March, the MCBA’s Judiciary Committee, chaired by the very dedicated Jennifer Sommers, has been hard at work on its annual judicial evaluation process. Last year the MCBA Board of Trustees approved a rules change following an extensive review of the Judicial Evaluations Rules. The primary change to the process was that the results of the judicial evaluation would serve more to simply inform the Committee in their process, instead of directing an automatic result.

Just last week the Judiciary Committee convened for interviews of four candidates, and I am pleased to report that we have the results:

Monroe County Surrogate’s Court
Hon. John M. Owens – Highly Qualified

Rochester City Court
Leticia D. Astacio – Qualified
William T. Gargan – Highly Qualified
Michael C. Lopez – Qualified

The results are being released to the media and our members.  As we enter into the election season, the MCBA will continue to promote its results in an effort to inform both the media and the public about our process. But I also wish to ask you to invest in the process. If you believe in the process, then educate your friends, family, colleagues and clients as to why they should understand the process, and why they should consider the results when they go to vote.

Grab the results, save it to your phone and as the elections approach, share the results at your family dinners, evening out with friends, your colleagues. Help us get the word out.

When the Judicial Evaluation Task Force was holding a member forum on this topic one of the criticisms we heard was about the promotion of the results. We do a significant amount of social media campaigning with the results, but we cannot do it alone. There is no advertising budget to run a media campaign, and we do not wish to increase dues to make that happen. With social media and the ability to send email with lightning speed, we encourage you to join our campaign team to spread the word.

If you have other ideas on how to spread the word, please let me know. Your insight is appreciated. The good news is we have four great candidates, so all we need to do now is get the word out to the public as to why they should care about judicial elections.

Thanks for checking in,

Mary

Life as a Bar President is a Journey…in more ways than one…

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One of the annual traditions for an incoming bar president is their participation in the ABA’s Bar Leadership Institute (BLI) which takes place in Chicago every March. No matter what the weather brings our way! The determination of the president-elects to get to Chicago despite the challenges of balancing 2-3 days out of the office, family responsibility, and inclement weather is admirable.

So I missed what sounds like “the storm” of 2014 because I went out one day early for the Chief Staff Executive Session. Fortunately, this time Chicago was spared the wrath of Vulcan. However, MCBA President-Elect Steve Modica had his bags packed and was ready to go yesterday, but alas, mother nature had different plans. His flight, along with thousands of others, was cancelled. But Steve was tireless and determined to get here, and by the time you read this, he will have already arrived. I heard of one president-elect that boarded a train at midnight last night, and arrived in Chicago this morning. Another bar group out of Indianapolis piled into a car, and drove through the storm to arrive safe last night.

Steve Modica talking

They get here, because they have an opportunity to sit in a room full of hundreds of bar leaders from all over the country, and to better understand this great responsibility they have assumed as next year’s President. The emphasis about BLI is to assist these leaders with new trends for bar associations, governance, media and communication tips, as well as working with the Executive Director, and so much more.

Depending on the president, it has been said that serving as president can consume as much as 1,000-1,200 hours during their term. That is close to 20-30 hours per week for 52 weeks. Some weeks it may be less, and other weeks I have witnessed more. And in case you are wondering, for the presidents, this is not a paid gig. This becomes a part-time job to their full-time job as practicing attorneys. And to be fair, their term as president-elect has also become pretty demanding as the president-elect assumes additional responsibilities to support the president.

This tireless commitment of these bar leaders really is extraordinary, and I don’t just mean because of their willingness to travel. When they receive the call about their nomination, there is excitement, a sense of honor, and all reports being humbled. When I finally begin to prep the president-elect for their term, one of the things I suggest to him or her is that they save room on their dance card for the “unknowns” that develop in their term. As we all know, “stuff happens.”

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Our current president, Diane Cecero, is a great example. Diane is in the process of a negotiation on indigent legal care services with Monroe County involving the Conflict Defender Office and the Assigned Council Panel. This is a very complex negotiation, and Diane with the support of many criminal defense attorneys, is spending an enormous amount of time on this matter. I have enjoyed watching and learning from Diane in these negotiations. Her tireless commitment to ensuring that the result is quality legal representation is her single priority in this negotiation.

I’ve watched in awe over the years Presidents handle difficult issues with professionalism and commitment, and this year is no different.  I, more than anyone, know what a president puts into their year, and how much time they put into difficult issues. They struggle to field the different opinions and come to the best solution through dialogue within the bar, the community, and sometimes, even the media. This was not training they received in law school – it’s learning by fire. The responsibility is great, and even greater, because they are your peers. The MCBA is a diverse bar with a diversity of opinions, so there will be disagreements. It simply cannot be avoided.

So I guess what I am suggesting is that until you walk in the shoes of the president, perhaps learn a little bit more about the responsibility that your colleague has taken on. It is significant. Can you imagine walking in their shoes for 1,000 hours for one year not knowing what’s coming? I think it takes very special people to say, “Yes, I would be honored to serve as MCBA President.”

I know I am honored to have worked with so many great presidents — 13 to date:  Mike Dwyer, Gene Clifford, June Castellano, Mike Wolford, Jim Grossman, Jill Schultz, Tom Smith, Andrew Brown, Harold Kurland, Sue Laluk, Bryan Hetherington, Connie Walker and Diane Cecero. And in the next few months, we will welcome Steve Modica. All of them worked incredibly hard, and when they get together they continue to talk about “those moments” in their presidency that will be with them forever. Next time you see one of them, thank them for their service.

Past Presidents WordPress

Thanks for checking in,

Mary

Invaluable life lesson…

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In this day and age of so much stress in our lives, short tempers and fuses, technology overload, pressure of balance in both our work and our life,  I was really taken by the following quote by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948); Indian Political and Spiritual Leader.

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How does the quote speak to you? For me, it really represents a life-lesson about how to conduct myself. I learned my own valuable lesson many, many years ago to be careful in this area. Some days, I am probably better at it than others, but this quote is now hanging over my desk and will serve as a reminder to me.

What about you? What does the quote mean to you?

I also bet some of you are thrilled this one is so brief!!

Thanks for checking in,

Mary